Digital Recordings

Taming the Amygdala: A Brain-Based Approach to Anxiety



New understandings in neuroscience have highlighted the central role the amygdala plays in anxiety. But how many of us can talk with our clients about the amygdala in a clear, engaging way that actually enhances treatment? This recording provides brain-based techniques that directly target the symptoms of anxiety at the neurological source. Discover effective strategies—designed to fit how the amygdala learns—that target triggers, panic attacks, nausea, and sleep problems. You’ll explore how to: 

  • Demystify the neurobiology of anxiety by introducing clients to the language of the amygdala in a way that engages them in treatment and makes interventions more effective 
  • Use neurologically informed CBT techniques to target the amygdala’s contributions to anxiety disorders, including OCD and PTSD 
  • Use cognitive restructuring, including cognitive defusion and reconsolidation, to resist cognitions that ignite amygdala-based responding 


Details

Product Details
Average Rating:
   5
Speakers:
Catherine M Pittman, PH.D., HSPP
Duration:
1 Hour 58 Minutes
Copyright:
Mar 19, 2021
Product Code:
NOS096111
Media Type:
Digital Recordings

CPD


CPD

This online program is worth 2 hours CPD.



Handouts

Speakers

Catherine M Pittman, PH.D., HSPP's Profile

Catherine M Pittman, PH.D., HSPP Related seminars and products


Catherine M. Pittman, Ph.D., HSPP, has a background in cognitive behavioral therapy, neuropsychology, fear-conditioning research, and treated anxiety-based disorders in clinical practice for over 25 years. Her experience makes her uniquely qualified to provide a clear understanding of neuroscience and how that informs the selection and application of successful anxiety treatment strategies.

Dr. Pittman is the author of the popular book, Rewire Your Anxious Brain: How to Use the Neuroscience of Fear to End Anxiety Panic, and Worry (New Harbinger Publications). Her new book, Taming Your Amygdala, will be published in Spring 2022 (PESI Publishing & Media). Dr. Pittman is a professor of Psychology at Saint Mary's College, Notre Dame, IN. She regularly presents workshops at national conferences and national webinars on anxiety treatment and is an active member of the Public Education Committee of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.

 

Speaker Disclosures:

Financial: Dr. Catherine Pittman maintains a private practice and has an employment relationship with Saint Mary's College. She is an author with New Harbinger, Foliadeux Press, and PESI Publishing and receives royalties. She receives a speaking honorarium and recording royalties from PESI, Inc. She has no relevant financial relationships with ineligible organizations.

Non-financial: Dr. Catherine Pittman is a member of the Benzodiazepine Information Coalition and the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.


Additional Info

Program Information

Access for Self-Study (Non-Interactive)

Access never expires for this product.


Objectives

  1. Appraise the role of the amygdala in maintaining anxiety disorders for purposes of client psychoeducation. 
  2. Demonstrate how clients who know the language of the amygdala have improved engagement and mindfulness.  
  3. Use neurologically informed strategies, such as exposure, relaxation, exercise, and sleep interventions to produce changes in the amygdala and improve client outcomes. 
  4. Use cognitive restructuring, cognitive defusion, and mindfulness techniques to reduce cognitions that ignite the amygdala activation that produces anxious responding. 

Outline

Describe the role of the amygdala in maintaining anxiety disorders for purposes of client psychoeducation. 

  • Explain amygdala as an alarm system that responds to danger. 
  • Explain amygdala as storing memories of emotional importance.
  • Describe responses of amygdala as not always appropriate to 21st century. 

Explain the language of the amygdala. 

  • Explain that the amygdala communicates through bodily responses. 
  • Explain that the amygdala does not learn from books or lectures. 
  • Explain that the amygdala learns from experience. 
  • Describe the association-based learning process (i.e., classical conditioning) 

Explain how clients who know the language of the amygdala have improved engagement and mindfulness.  

  • Recognition of ways to change amygdala responding is empowering. 
  • Recognition of the purpose of symptoms such as increased heart rate, muscle tension allow one to observe and interpret these responses differently. 
  • Attributing anxiety responses to amygdala helps client to dissociate from and take the role of an observer of these responses. 

Use neurologically informed strategies such as exposure, relaxation, exercise, and sleep interventions to produce changes in the amygdala. 

  • Present exposure is a way of teaching the amygdala new associations and responses. 
  • Teach relaxation strategies that reduce amygdala in minutes. 
  • Identify the ability of regular exercise and adequate sleep to produce lasting changes in amygdala activation. 

Use neurologically informed strategies such as cognitive restructuring, cognitive defusion, and mindfulness techniques to reduce cognitions that ignite the amygdala activation that produces anxious responding. 

  • Teach clients that the amygdala responds to cortex activity that presents threatening thoughts, images, or worries. 
  • Teach clients to recognize worries and anticipatory thoughts as simply thoughts and not as accurate predictors of the future.     
  • Train clients to observe and be curious about their anxiety responses rather than get caught up in the experience of anxiety. 

Target Audience

  • Counselors
  • Social Workers
  • Psychologists
  • Psychotherapists
  • Therapists
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Addiction Counselors
  • Case Managers
  • Physicians
  • Nurses
  • Other Mental Health Professionals

Reviews

5
4
3
2
1

Overall:      5

Total Reviews: 2

Satisfaction Guarantee
Your satisfaction is our goal and our guarantee. Concerns should be addressed to info@pesi.co.uk or call 01235847393.

Please wait ...

Back to Top